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NLECTC Law Enforcement & Corrections Technology News
Summary
Thursday, April 25, 2002

The National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology
Center (NLECTC) provides the following information as a
service to law enforcement, corrections, and forensic
science practitioners. The summary includes abstracts
of
articles from major national newspapers, business
magazines,
Web sites, national and international wire services, and
periodicals focusing on law enforcement and corrections
technology. Please note that providing synopses of
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on law enforcement and corrections technology or the
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Reproduction of this text is encouraged; however copies
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Technology News Summary should be cited as the source
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information. Copyright 2002, Information Inc.,
Bethesda, MD.


***************************ARTICLES*************************

"Cyber Crime Stoppers"
St. Paul Pioneer Press (04/22/02) P. 1E; Suzukamo,
Leslie
Brooks

Minneapolis' police department fights crimes using an
email
group, also called a listserv or mailing list. Officer
Craig
Williams and civilian crime-prevention employee Luther
Krueger use the so-called virtual block club to exchange
messages with approximately 430 people across downtown
Minneapolis. The police department sends emails to
office,
bar, restaurant, and parking ramp managers and owners.
The
email group lets people become involved according to
their
own schedule, says Williams. Since the program's full
implementation in June 2000, crime has measurably
dropped,
says Krueger. For example, petty theft reports fell by
21
percent from 2000 to 2001, he says. Minneapolis police
have
also developed a Web site offering innovative features
for
the community. Visitors can read and respond to past
messages, find traffic updates regarding new rail
construction, and view maps of crime locations.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/business/industries/compute
rs_and_intern
et/3111793.htm


"BI Incorporated's Biometric Systems Well Received in
Community Corrections"
PRNewswire (04/22/02)

Two new technologies by BI Incorporated, the VoiceID and
Sobrietor, are being integrated into community
correctional
institutions' offender monitoring systems all over the
country. VoiceID allows officers to confirm the
location of
offenders via predetermined or random phone calls and
almost
instant verification of the person's identity using
VoiceVault, a Buytel technology system for voice
verification. The Sobrietor, also integrated with a
voice
verification system, is a deep breath testing device
powered
by fuel cell technology that tests the offender for
alcohol
usage. VoiceID has had several upgrades with the
addition of
new features, including Spanish-language instructional
prompts that make it easier for Hispanic offenders to
put
through their phone calls; a dedicated 24/7 technical
and
monitoring support system; automated defaults that
reduce
enrollment time to under three minutes; and a 0.5 second
offender recognition system. http://www.prnewswire.com


"Officers From Around the Country to Participate in Mock
Prison Riot"
Associated Press (04/21/02)

The sixth annual Mock Prison Riot at a former West
Virginia
Penitentiary of Moundsville will bring together law
enforcement and corrections officials from as many as 19
states, including West Virginia, South Carolina, New
York,
Alabama, Georgia, Maryland, and Oregon. The mock riot
will
be hosted by the Office of Law Enforcement Technology
Commercialization and will give the officers an
opportunity
to test new technologies in an emergency situation. The
PepperBall System, a device that fires a small plastic
capsule containing a skin and eye irritant, will be
among
the tested technologies. The device "fills the gap
between
empty-handed techniques and the use of a deadly weapon
when
trying to apprehend a violent criminal," says Bob
Coburn,
training manager at the National Corrections and Law
Enforcement Training and Technology Center at the old
prison. http://www.ap.org


"More Sophisticated Scanners Can Tell Much More About
You"
Miami Herald (04/19/02); Tan, Shannon

Businesses and government agencies interested in
tightening
security have increasingly turned to Intelli-Check,
Logix,
and CardCom Technology for more advanced driver's
license
scanners. The scanners reveal all the information
encoded on
bar codes or magnetic strips on the back of the
licenses.
IntelliCheck can customize its products to allow
business to
flag former employees and for airlines to catch
suspected
terrorists. The scanners can also be used to create
customer
databases or to learn about client demographics.
Businesses
have turned to the new technology because the amount of
different driver's license types and counterfeit
licenses
have become unwieldy for security officers to learn.
Proponents of privacy are concerned that the Driver's
Privacy Protection Act is abridged by the scanners;
American
Civil Liberties Union associate director Barry
Steinhardt is
afraid that driver's licenses could become
identification
cards. http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/


"Taser Strategy: Zap, Crackle, Stop; Boulder Police
Demonstrate New 'Pain Compliance' Weapon"
Rocky Mountain News (04/19/02) P. 32A; Good, Owen S.

The Boulder, Colo., Police Department recently spent
$7,375
on eight new weapons for its arsenal--the M-26 Advanced
Taser, or a "pain compliance" tool, is capable of
sending a
five-second, 50,000 volt charge up to 21 feet away. Two
hair-thin filaments attached to quarter-inch barbed
hooks
are deployed through a nitrogen gas discharge, to snag
skin
or clothes, and carry enough of a jolt of electricity to
knock even a big, muscular perpetrator flat. Pain
compliance
is a new concept in handling violent behavior; in some
instances, just the threat of pain is sufficient to
calm the
aggressor. Detective Barry Hartkopp, a volunteer
demonstrator, said he has taken a lot of bruises from
being
playing the "aggressor" role in training exercises over
the
years and has been "shot" with behavior control weapons
from
pepper balls to beanbags, but noted that just one
second of
the Taser charge was as much pain as he could stand.
Hartkopp stressed that the Taser is not the weapon of
choice
during demonstrations, protests, or riots, noting that
under
those circumstances, using Tasers has a tendency to
enrage
the bystanders. The Taser is effective in gaining
quicker
control, according to Detective Jeff Kessler, as the
associated pain ends quickly enough for the person to
listen
to a police officer's demands. Pain associated with
other
methods of control, including pepper spray, can last up
to
30 minutes and detract the aggressor's attention from
complying with what the police officer is instructing
him to
do. Thirty Boulder police officers are trained on the
M-26
Advanced Taser. http://www.rockymountainnews.com


"The Search for Answers to Sharing Crime Information"
National Journal's Technology Daily (04/19/02); Porteus,
Liza

In an effort to increase the use of technology in law
enforcement, the Justice Department's National Criminal
History Improvement Program (NCHIP) has insisted their
program SEARCH is an effective way to check for state
and
federal criminal records. Since the Sept. 11 terrorist
attacks, the Bush administration has asked for an
increase
in information sharing among governments, employee
background checks, and visa applications checkups.
SEARCH
Executive Director Gary Cooper says states' first
impulse is
to only check federal databases such as the FBI's. "The
fact
is, there are many more criminal-history records at the
state level collectively than presides as the FBI, and
they
are more complete records," he explains. SEARCH board
member
and Missouri CIO Gerry Wethingon says law enforcement
players must familiarize themselves with the
representatives
of the National Law Enforcement Telecommunications
System--a
message-switching network that connects local, state,
and
federal agencies to facilitate information sharing on
criminal justice and public safety--and that law
enforcement
officials are joining to share ideas on how to improve
the
use of technology in the criminal justice system.
SEARCH is
currently being tested in New Mexico, Colorado,
Wisconsin
and Minnesota. http://www.nationaljournal.com


"White House Official Asks Colleges to Help Create
National
Computer-Security Strategy"
Chronicle of Higher Education Online (04/19/02);
Carnevale,
Dan

Speaking at the Networking 2002 conference, the
president's
cyberspace security advisor Richard A. Clarke urged U.S.
colleges and universities to contribute to the
development
of a national computer security strategy so networks are
adequately protected against enemy attacks. Educational
institutions and businesses should determine how open
they
are to cyberattacks and share plans for safeguarding
their
systems, he recommended. Clarke maintained that
colleges and
universities have always had a vital role in national
security, partly because they can focus on long-term,
high-risk research projects that businesses cannot. He
said
the Bush administration would endorse the institutions'
efforts without dispensing financial aid. The White
House
will release a report in late July that provides
guidelines
for computer network security, and Clarke promised that
"It's not going to be one of these coffee-table books
issued
by Washington once a year." The American Association of
State Colleges and the American Council on Education
are a
few educational organizations that have recently
announced
plans to coordinate cybersecurity research.
http://chronicle.com/free/2002/04/2002041901t.htm


"Experts Chew on National ID Card Idea"
IDG News Service (04/18/02); Pruitt, Scarlet

Despite the enthusiasm for a national ID card system
with
biometric identifiers favored by industry heavyweights
such
as Oracle CEO Larry Ellison, the scale and associated
costs
of such an initiative has dampened government support.
Meanwhile, experts at the Computers, Freedom, and
Privacy
conference in San Francisco asserted that the practical
implications are also staggering. Chief researcher for
the
Privacy Foundation Andrew Schulman notes that
deployment and
viability concerns have not really been addressed. The
task
of designing, implementing, and maintaining a system
that
serves 250 million Americans would be an unprecedented
burden, according to the experts. Maintaining the
security
and privacy of such a vast amount of biometric data also
adds to the general reluctance to pursue such an
initiative.
AAMVA Net CEO Jay Maxwell estimates that every dollar
spent
for each new ID card would raise the project's budget by
$250 million. He also says that some states have issued
biometric drivers' licenses that are unfortunately
non-interoperable.
http://www.pcworld.com/resource/article/0,aid,94823,00.asp


"Millions Spent to Develop Cameras"
Washington Times (04/17/02) P. 1; DeBose, Brian

The General Accounting Office conducted a survey of 35
government agencies from the second half of last year to
January. The survey examined the federal spending
habits of
the agencies, and found that 17 participants have
invested
more than $50 million since 1997 for the development of
camera surveillance technology. The development of
facial
recognition technology accounted for more than 90
percent of
the participants' surveillance expenditures. The report,
which did not include this year's budget, indicated
that the
Defense and Justice Departments invested more on facial
recognition than all the other study participants
combined.
In addition, the report notes that interest in facial
recognition technology has risen following Sept. 11, and
several agencies said their surveillance budgets would
likely increase. However, a National Institute for
Standards
in Technology report found that 43 percent of scans
obtained
by facial recognition technology resulted in false
negatives. http://www.washtimes.com


"Proposal Sets National Rules for State IDs"
Washington Post (04/17/02) P. A7; Hsu, Spencer S.

Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) on Tuesday introduced a
bill
that would enable government agencies to share driver's
license data. The network of government databases is one
goal of Durbin's effort to set national standards for
state-issued driver's licenses. Additionally, Durbin's
proposal would make use of security features such as
holograms or other unique identifiers as
anti-counterfeiting
measures on driver's licenses. The current system for
granting licenses has come under increasing scrutiny,
as the
nation recovers from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
Boosters for license standards note that eight of the 19
terrorists who carried out the attacks obtained
state-issued
licenses in Virginia. Although the measure has strong
support among police chiefs and the administrators of
state
motor vehicle departments, civil liberties and consumer
advocates are concerned that national standards for
state
driver's licenses would create a de facto national ID.
Critics add that police, marketers, and others would
eventually try to exploit and expand the government
databases, which they also believe will be vulnerable to
terrorists and criminals. Rep. James P. Moran (D-Va.) is
considering a House version that would use "biometric"
technology on driver's licenses, such as fingerprint or
retinal-scan data.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62695-2002Apr16.html


"White House Cyber Czar Describes Next Phase of Internet
Plan"
GovExec.com (04/17/02); Harris, Shane

The Govnet initiative of the Bush administration could
evolve in a number of directions, according to Richard
Clarke, President Bush's top advisor on national
cybersecurity. On Wednesday, during a conference
attended by
hundreds of federal technology personnel and industry
officials, Clarke said the Bush administration could
move in
the direction of improving security on existing
computer-based networks, switching agencies over to
existing
standalone networks, or allowing agencies to build
their own
secure networks. Other options are creating a
multi-agency
intranet, or creating a back-up network that would
enable
critical government operations to continue in the event
of a
terrorist attack. Clarke did not indicate whether the
White
House favors a certain approach, and did not back any
particular strategy. The goal of the Govnet initiative
is to
create an information network for the federal government
that would be impenetrable. A General Services
Administration team says such a standalone network is
technologically feasible, although some companies have
criticized the initiative as being unclear and
underfunded.
The Bush administration acknowledges that Govnet is
simply a
"concept," and not a real project at this stage.
http://www.govexec.com/dailyfed/0402/041702h1.htm


"Database Launched for Crime Victims"
ZDNet (04/16/02); Kane, Margaret

The U.S. Justice Department has established a new
database
system called the Victim Notification System (VNS) that
will
keep crime victims up to date on any developments in
their
cases. The VNS is a joint project of the Federal Bureau
of
Prisons, the U.S. Attorney's Office, and the FBI. The
new
database system will alert crime victims through email,
letter, fax or other means every time there is a
development
in a case, such as an arrest or the imprisonment of the
offender. Caseworkers are able to insert information
into
the VNS--which currently handles information for over
80,000
victims of crime--through an Internet interface.
http://zdnet.com.com/2102-1106-884079.html


"Uncle Sam Eyeing Communication Call for New Networks:
Government Spending on Communication Gear Could Help
Cisco,
Others"
Investor's Business Daily (04/16/02) P. A6; Angell,
Mike

The U.S. government's and military's need for improved
national security, disaster preparedness, and military
action will force them to seek better data and voice
networks. The $48.2 million the United States is
projected
to spend on information technology in fiscal 2002 will
help
companies such as Cisco Systems and Avaya, though the
government has strict technical requirements and tends
to be
slow to spend. Payton Smith, an input analyst, predicts
that
$722 million of the proposed $38 billion 2003 budget
for the
Office of Homeland Security will go toward building and
bettering networks. One proposal calls for the creation
of
the GovNet private data network, which would allow the
government to communicate if the Internet was damaged.
The
government is also in the process of changing the
Defense
Switched Network from a traditional phone circuit switch
technology to an IP Network. http://www.investors.com


"Ashcroft Orders More Info Sharing"
Federal Computer Week (04/15/02); Mathews, William

Attorney General John Ashcroft recently told a number of
federal intelligence and law enforcement agencies to
share
information more efficiently, particularly when they are
engaged in the common purpose of fighting terrorism. The
attorney general's instructions are aimed at the newly
established Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force, the
Justice Department's Criminal Section, the U.S. Marshals
Service, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the
Immigration and Naturalization Service, and the FBI.
These
instructions include: the identification by the Foreign
Terrorist Tracking Task Force of the data and datasets
it
requires to carry out its mission. Second, the Justice
Department has been instructed to figure out ways for
local
and state law enforcement agencies to obtain access to
unclassified but secure information over an
Internet-based
system. Third, the FBI has been told to implement
procedures
so it can obtain fingerprints and other information on
suspected terrorists from other agencies on a regular
basis.
Finally, Ashcroft has instructed the named agencies to
create procedures so that information on terrorists in
federal law enforcement databases can be shared with
other
relevant agencies. However, the attorney general's
directive, which was issued April 11, does not order
specific agencies to actually start sharing information
with
other agencies, and it does not provide any more funds
for
agencies to upgrade their data systems.
http://www.fcw.com/fcw/articles/2002/0415/news-doj-04-15-02.asp


"Non-Lethal Weaponry Part of 2002 Winter Olympic
Security
Success"
Business Wire (04/15/02)

The Salt Lake County Sheriff's Office--along with
almost 800
other law enforcement, corrections, and government
agencies--has adopted Jaycor Tactical Systems'
PepperBall
System, a non-lethal crowd and riot control technology.
The
product is an effective blend of kinetic impact and
pepper
powder. The Salt Lake County Sheriff's Office used the
PepperBalls on the last day of the 2002 Winter Olympics
to
bring a drunken mob under control. According to Salt
Lake
County Sheriff Aaron Kennard, the crowd broke up within
minutes and there were no reported injuries.
http://www.businesswire.com


"Silicon Valley's Spy Game"
New York Times Magazine (04/14/02) P. 46; Rosen,
Jeffrey

The tech bubble implosion and Sept. 11 is redefining
Silicon
Valley as the military's technology provider, and the
Office
of Homeland Security has an agenda to use e-business
consumer tracking technology to trace and thwart
terrorists.
The goal of integrating disparate state and federal
databases into one so that agencies can share
information
about U.S. citizens is being cheered by tech
entrepreneurs
such as Oracle CEO Larry Ellison, who argues that
consolidation is "The single thing we could do to make
life
tougher for terrorists." He also supports the creation
of a
national ID card system that would be connected to the
central database so foreigners can be monitored. Oracle
is
developing a hospital surveillance system called Leaders
(Lightweight Epidemiology Advanced Detection and
Emergency
Response System) that would track disease outbreaks
across
the country. Meanwhile, Accenture and HNC Software,
along
with the Federal Aviation Authority, are planning to
test a
system based on profiling methods originally used to
detect
credit-card fraud; its primary function is to catch
terrorists by assigning air travelers a "threat index"
based
on their travel history, living arrangements, and other
personal data. Such initiatives have raised the specter
of
citizens' privacy rights getting trampled, but Ellison
believes the advent of central databases signals the
extinction of privacy, and advocates the relaxation of
information restriction laws with his argument that the
threat to American lives outweighs grumblings about
civil
liberty violations. A balance must be struck between
privacy
and security, and technologists are eager to hand that
job
off to politicians who are often unfamiliar with the
technology. http://www.newyorktimes.com/library/magazine/home


"Joint Operations Succeed"
Design News (04/08/02) P. 71; Ogando, Joseph

When Walter Cardwell needed to improve the
manufacturability
of his Spitfire self-defense spray, he turned to
Phillips,
Wisc.-based Phillips Plastics. Engineers at Phillips
recommended changing the welding horn shape so the
overmolded elastomer grip would not be melted when the
two
housing halves are welded together. The Spitfire places
replaceable pepper-spray canisters into a quick-draw
housing
and has a unique sliding firing button with a built-in
safety. The next generation of Spitfires, which orient
the
canister and the nozzle in the same direction for
intuitive
aiming, will move away from welding and instead use a
hand-assembled snap-fit design. Other improvements made
by
Phillips include a new cam-lock, which cannot be
over-tightened as the current threaded versions can.
http://www.manufacturing.net/dn/index.asp?
layout=articleWebzine&articleId=CA202571


"CTS' Flash-Bang Training System"
Law Enforcement Technology (03/02) Vol. 29, No. 3, P.
86;
Nielsen, Eugene

The noise/flash diversion device (NFDD) increased in
usage
after its success during Israel's Entebbe raid in 1976
to
rescue the passengers of a downed airplane that had been
hijacked. Proper training is required to maintain safe
use
of NFDDs. The Model 7290T Training Flash-Bang by
Combined
Tactical Systems Inc. is a NFDD designed for tactical
training purposes. The reload devise has dual safety
measures, a one of a kind pull-ring safety clip, and a
cotter pin. The reload produces a sound similar to a
thunder
clap or small firecracker. This is done without any
detectable pressure wave on the Andersen Blausage, the
device that measures the blast level, making this NFDD
one
of the safer ones to use. http://www.law-enforcement.com


"Fingerprint and Palmprint Identification"
Law Enforcement Technology (03/02) Vol. 29, No. 3, P.
60;
Kanable, Rebecca

Fingerprints captured electronically with Livescan are
then
compared with an automated identification system (AFIS)
for
background checks and other security reasons. Livescan
sales
have increased dramatically since Sept. 11, largely
because
security has tightened everywhere and more companies are
screening job applicants more thoroughly. These
increased
sales are expected to change technology, making
livescans
that are easier to use and produce more information.
Additionally, too many limitations exist between AFIS
systems. Vendors predict better networking and
interoperability in the future. http://www.law-enforcement.com


"War on Terror Brings High-Security Inmates to
Alexandria
Jail"
Sheriff (03/02) Vol. 54, No. 2, P. 12; Terault, Mike

The sheriff of the Alexandria, Va., Detention Center,
James
Dunning, was already housing high-security inmates such
as
convicted spy Robert Hanssen when alleged terrorist
Zacarias
Moussaoui was recently brought to his facility. While
plans
to heighten security were already under way prior to
Sept.
11, after that date, finishing the concrete barrier
around
the center became the priority. The perimeter barrier
ensures that all vehicles pass through the security
checkpoint. Although the Alexandria Detention Center
has new
high-tech security features, Dunning contends that
dedicated, professional personnel are the key to
security,
and emphasizes that all inmates are treated equally,
regardless of their crime. An exception exists when an
inmate may be in danger, or a risk to himself or others.
There has never been a fatality during the center's 15
years
of operation. http://www.sheriffs.org


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